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Ambitious Loro Parque says goodbye to single-use plastic

LORO Parque is progressing with its strategy to get rid of single-use plastic from its facilities. And already, it has replaced numerous products with alternatives, manufactured with biodegradable and compostable materials.

Among other actions, the world-famous Puerto zoo, a prolific supporter of environmental projects, is committed to replacing single-use, plastic water bottles with other biodegradable and compostable water bottles.

It is acknowledged, by making such a big decision, as one of the European zoos’ pioneers in the vast battle against plastic. And it is only a matter of weeks before the new bottles are available to visitors.

In addition, several sustainable options have been introduced in the Park’s restaurants to reduce, progressively, the use of plastic, such as spoons, straws or slush glasses, while work continues in the search for more alternatives.

Also, the raincoats available to customers in “Orca Ocean” have been replaced by ponchos, made with organic raw material from corn.

Changes have also been made with the staff, such as the installation of water dispensers with returnable drums, and re-usable aluminium bottles, or cloth bags to replace the plastic bags previously used.

Likewise, Loro Parque Fundación has put on sale different articles, made entirely of recycled plastic (R-PET), and its distribution will contribute to the awareness of visitors to the Park about the effects of the use of this material.

Cushions, slippers, bags and backpacks are some of the products, in which no water has been used in its manufacture, and nor has CO2 been emitted into the atmosphere.

Loro Parque says it recognises the importance of minimising the use of plastic, because of its degrading impact on nature.

Every year, it is estimated that the oceans accumulate between eight and 13 million tons of plastic, which is equivalent to a minimum of 800 times the weight of the Eiffel Tower, or 34 times the surface of Manhattan.

And it is estimated that, in the year 2050, there will be more plastic in them than fish,” said a spokesman.

Thus, Loro Parque, strengthening its role as a centre for the conservation of wildlife, has decided to take measures, both in reducing the quantities of plastic used in its facilities, eliminating, at least 80% of its the single-use plastic, and in the awareness of its visitors about this mammoth problem.

The Park, also represented by Loro Parque Fundación, expresses its concern for the future of humanity. By the year 2050, 85% of the population will live in cities, and life expectancy will reach 90 years.

In view of this data, the zoo wonders: “How the planet will cope with all these difficulties, if its human inhabitants do not begin to act in its favour, from now on?”

 

Short URL: http://www.canarianweekly.com/?p=43942

Posted by on Oct 11 2018. Filed under Local News, News Alert. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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